Health Tips

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Ten (10) HOME REMEDIES FOR FLU


Flu symptoms can cause a world of misery, from fever and cough to sore throat, nasal congestion, aches, and chills. But there are ways to feel better. Prescription antiviral drugs may ease symptoms of the flu when taken shortly after you get sick. In many cases, however, simple home remedies may be all you need for relief of mild to moderate flu symptoms.
Here are 10 natural remedies for the flu:

  • 1. Drink up. The flu can leave you dehydrated, especially if have vomiting or diarrhea. So be sure to get enough fluids. Water is fine. So are fruit juices, soda, and electrolyte beverages. You may want to stay away from caffeinated drinks, because caffeine is a diuretic. Herbal tea with honey can soothe a sore throat. If you feel nauseated, try taking small sips of liquids — gulps might cause you to throw up. How can you be sure you’re getting enough fluid? Your urine should be pale yellow, almost colorless. How about drinking alcohol? No way. “When you have the flu, the last thing you want to do is drink alcohol,” says William Schaffner, MD, chairman of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, Tenn. “It makes you sleepy, and flu does that already.”

  • 2. Sip some soup. For generations, caring parents have been serving chicken soup to kids with colds and flu. But was mom right? Possibly. A study published in the journal Chest showed that chicken soup may help with symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections like the flu. “I believe that chicken soup does help with symptoms,” says Reid B. Blackwelder, MD, professor of family medicine at East Tennessee State University in Kingsport. But not all doctors agree that chemistry alone explains the soup’s apparent benefits. “When you lean over a bowl of hot chicken soup and the vapor gets up your nose, you feel better,” Schaffner says. “But some [of the benefit] is clearly emotional. It just makes you feel better having someone make soup for you.”

  • 3. Be a couch potato. Listen to your body. If it’s telling you not to exercise, don’t. If it’s urging you to spend all day in bed, do. Don’t press on with daily chores even in the face of severe cold or flu symptoms. Rest is “another way of supporting the body’s ability to fight infection,” Blackwelder says. And don’t skimp on nighttime sleep. “Good sleep cycles help the immune system work well, so it’s important to get your full eight hours of sleep each night,” Schaffner says.

  • 4. Humidify. Breathing moist air helps ease nasal congestion and sore throat pain. One good strategy is to indulge in a steamy shower several times a day — or just turn on the shower and sit in the bathroom for a few minutes, inhaling the steam. Another is to use a humidifier. Clean it often to make sure it’s free of mold and mildew.

  • 5. Make a tent. Need a quick way to open clogged airways? Bring a pot of water to a boil and remove it from the heat. Drape a towel over your head, close your eyes, and lean over the water under the “tent,” breathing deeply through your nose for 30 seconds. David Kiefer, MD, clinical instructor of family medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle, recommends adding a drop or two of peppermint or eucalyptus oil to the water for extra phlegm-busting power. Repeat this as often as necessary to ease congestion.

  • 6. Try a warm compress. On the forehead and nose, a warm cloth is a great way to relieve headache or sinus pain.

  • 7. Be a sucker. Cough drops, throat lozenges, and hard candy can be surprisingly effective at easing a cough or sore throat. Some doctors, including Kiefer, swear by lozenges containing slippery elm. Others recommend zinc lozenges to help shorten cold symptoms, though Schaffner is not convinced of their effectiveness. “If there is an effect [against colds and flu], it’s a small one,” he says. “I wish their effect were as good as their taste is bad.”

  • 8. Swish and spit. Gargling with salt water helps get rid of the thick mucus that can collect at the back of the throat, especially after you’ve been lying down. It can also help ease stuffy ears, Kiefer says.

  • 9. Try nasal irrigation. To ease stuffiness and post-nasal drip — and perhaps cut the risk of getting a sinus infection — some doctors recommend nasal irrigation. You can buy a neti pot in health food stores and drugstores, or opt for a saline squeeze bottle. You pour salt water into one nostril and let it run out the other, clearing out your nasal passages. You can buy pre-made saline solution or make it by mixing salt and lukewarm water.

  • 10. Line up a caregiver. A caregiver can’t lower your temperature or cure a sore throat, but “having someone to tuck you into bed and bring you fluids is very comforting,” says Blackwelder. If a friend or family member offers to help, even if it’s only to stop by and check in on you, count your blessings — and take them up on it.



  • DO YOU SNORE? IS SNORING DISTURBING YOUR RELATIONSHIP? THEN THIS TOPIC IS FOR YOU


    This topic is about simple snoring. If you stop breathing, choke, or gasp during sleep, you may have a problem called sleep apnea, which can be serious. For more information, see the topic Sleep Apnea.
    You snore when the flow of air from your mouth or nose to your lungs makes the tissues of your throat vibrate when you sleep. This can make a loud, raspy noise. Loud snoring can make it hard for you and your partner to get a good night’s sleep.
    You may not know that you snore. Your bed partner may notice the snoring and that you sleep with your mouth open. If snoring keeps you or your bed partner from getting a good night’s sleep, one or both of you may feel tired during the day.
    Snoring may point to other medical problems, such as obstructive sleep apnea. Sleep apnea can be a serious problem, because you stop breathing at times during sleep. So if you snore often, talk to your doctor about it.
    Snoring is more common in men than in women.
    When you sleep, the muscles in the back of the roof of your mouth (soft palate), tongue, and throat relax. If they relax too much, they narrow or block your airway. As you breathe, your soft palate camera.gif and uvula vibrate and knock against the back of your throat. This causes the sounds you hear during snoring.
    The tonsils and adenoids camera.gif may also vibrate. The narrower the airway is, the more the tissue vibrates, and the louder the snoring is.
    You may be able to treat snoring by making changes in your lifestyle and in the way you prepare for sleep. For example:

  • 1. Lose weight if you are overweight.

  • 2.Quit smoking.

  • 3. Sleep on your side and not your back.

  • 4. Limit your use of alcohol and medicines such as sedatives before you go to bed.

  • 5. If a stuffy nose makes your snoring worse, use nose strips, decongestants, or nasal corticosteroid sprays to help you breathe.

  • 6. Try using devices that you attach to the outside of your nose to help with breathing while you sleep. These include nasal strips and nasal disks.

  • 7. When you sleep, use a device in your mouth that helps you breathe easier. This device pushes your tongue and jaw forward to improve airflow.


  • If these treatments don’t work, you may be able to use a machine that helps you breathe while you sleep. This treatment is called continuous positive airway pressure, or CPAP (say “SEE-pap”). In rare cases, your doctor may suggest surgery to open your airway.
    Snoring isn’t always considered a medical problem, so find out if your insurance covers the cost of treatment.




    How to Handle Heart Emergencies


    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a sudden, unexpected death caused by loss of heart function (sudden cardiac arrest). It is responsible for most ”natural deaths” in the U.S., with about 325,000 adults dying each year. SCD is responsible for half of all heart disease deaths.

    SCD occurs most frequently in adults; the risk rises with age. SCD affects men twice as often as it does women. SCD is rare in children, affecting only one to two per 100,000 children each year. Recommended Related to Heart Disease




    How Can I Prevent Heart Disease?


    Sudden cardiac arrest can be reversed if treated within the first few minutes. The American Heart Association promotes these four steps, called ”the chain of survival:”

  • 1. Early Access to Care. Quick contact with emergency care is essential. (in most communities) or your local emergency number immediately.

  • 2. Early Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR). Learning CPR is the greatest gift you can give your family and friends. If performed properly, CPR can help save a life until emergency medical help arrives.

  • 3. Early Defibrillation. In most adults, sudden cardiac death is related to ventricular fibrillation. Quick defibrillation (delivery of an electrical shock) is necessary to return the heart rhythm to a normal heartbeat. Many public places — such as malls, golf courses, and airports — have automated external defibrillators available for use in emergency situations.

  • 4. Early Advanced Care. After successful defibrillation, most patients require hospital care to treat and prevent future events.

  • These four steps can increase survival as much as 90% if initiated within the first minutes after sudden cardiac arrest. Survival decreases by about 10% each minute longer.




    What Is CPR?


    CPR is an emergency technique used to help someone whose heart and/or breathing has stopped.


    When a person’s heart stops, blood stops circulating throughout the body. If a person stops breathing, the blood can’t get oxygen. Therefore, it is vital for people in this emergency situation to receive medical treatment, such as CPR, within the first few minutes of the event.


    By administering a combination of manual chest compressions and artificial, or “mouth-to-mouth,” respiration, the rescuer can breathe for the victim and help circulate some of the blood throughout his or her body.


    CPR does not restart a heart that has stopped, but it can keep a victim alive until more aggressive treatment (defibrillation) can be administered.


    CPR is not difficult to learn, and many organizations offer courses in CPR, including the American Heart Association, the American Red Cross, local community centers, health clubs, and YMCAs.



    What Is an AED?

    An AED — which stands for automatic external defibrillator — is a device used to administer an electric shock through the chest wall to the heart. The device has built-in computers that assess the victim’s heart rhythm, judge whether defibrillation is needed, and then administer the shock. Audible and/or visual prompts guide the user through the process.



    Who Can Use an AED?

    Most AEDs are designed to be used by non-medical people such as fire department personnel, police officers, lifeguards, flight attendants, security guards, teachers, and even family members of people at high risk of sudden cardiac death.


    The goal is to provide access to defibrillation when needed as quickly as possible. CPR along with AEDs can dramatically increase survival rates for sudden cardiac arrest. Can an AED Shock a Person Who Is Not in Cardiac Arrest?


    No. An AED treats only a heart in an abnormal rhythm. If a person is in cardiac arrest without such a rhythm, the heart will not respond to electric currents. CPR should be administered until medical help arrives.




    SILENT STROKE: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
    Have you had a stroke? How could you tell?


    A stroke is a sudden stop of blood supply to part of the brain. Some people have strokes without ever knowing it. These so-called silent strokes either have no easy-to-recognize symptoms, or you don’t remember them. But they do cause permanent damage in your brain.
    If you’ve had more than one silent stroke, you may have thinking and memory problems. They can also lead to more severe strokes.
    If you have a silent stroke, you probably won’t know it, unless you happen to have a brain scan and the damage shows up. You may have slight memory problems or a little difficulty getting around. A doctor may be able to see signs of silent strokes without testing. Different From TIA
    Like most regular strokes, silent strokes are caused by blood clots in the brain that don’t dissolve.
    Warning strokes, known as TIAs, or transient ischemic attacks, are caused by blood clots that dissolve on their own in 5 minutes or less. Unlike silent strokes, they don’t permanently damage the brain. If you have a TIA, you’ll probably have some of these typical stroke symptoms:

  • One side of the face drooping or feeling numb

  • Weakness or numbness in one arm or leg

  • Slurred or hard-to-understand speech

  • Difficulty understanding speech

  • Sudden confusion

  • Sudden loss of balance or coordination

  • Sudden severe headaches

  • If you have any of these symptoms, call 911, even if it goes away after a few minutes. Like strokes, TIAs are medical emergencies, and it’s important to treat them quickly. Silent Strokes More Common Than You’d Expect

  • A study of middle-aged people with no apparent signs of stroke found that about 10% had brain damage from one.

  • High blood pressure and irregular heartbeat raise your risk.

  • The damage that occurs is permanent, but therapy might help you regain functions that may have weakened, using other parts of your brain. Prevent Strokes With Good Habits

  • These healthy habits can help you lower your risk of both stroke and heart disease:

  • Monitor and control your blood pressure.

  • Monitor and control your cholesterol.

  • Keep your blood sugar under control.

  • If you smoke, quit.

  • Eat a healthy diet that includes plenty of fresh fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Cut back on fat, salt, and sugar.

  • Get regular exercise.

  • Keep a healthy weight.

  • To be healthy, one needs to exercise, drink more water, have plenty rest, eat balanced diet, and above all drink food supplement like LINA GREEN TEA everyday. DO YOU KNOW THAT YOUR NORMAL PRESSURE SHOULD BE 110/75? IF YOURS IS ABOVE THEN YOU STAND THE CHANCE OF GETTING STROKE. PLEASE READ THIS FOR MORE INFORMATION




    BEWARE OF SUGAR!


    Sugar causes:

  • bodily weakness and pains

  • weak eye sight

  • menstrual disorders

  • diabetes

  • sexual weakness

  • tooth decay and toothache

  • Contact Dr. Caesar for alternative medications for good health.




    SIMPLE HEALTH TIPS FOR WOMEN IN THEIR 40S AND 50S


  • 1. Revisit your contraceptive method. “If you’ve been on oral contraceptives, as you get older you may want to consider switching to an IUD or other method, due to cardiovascular risk factors,” says JoAnn Manson, chief of the division of preventive medicine at Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Birth control pills may increase some women’s risk of heart disease.

  • 2. Manage menopause.

  • One day, it’s birth control; the next, hot flashes. Welcome to midlife. Talk to your medical provider before menopausal symptoms kick in and discuss what you might want to do to decrease discomfort. “If you have moderate to severe menopausal symptoms and are at low risk for breast cancer and heart disease, short-term hormonal therapy (HRT) might be right for you,” Manson says.

  • 3. Keep an eye on your calcium.

  • As you’re moving into menopause, it’s a critical time for women to preserve bone health and stave off osteoporosis. If you don’t get enough dairy in your diet, take a twice-daily supplement with calcium and vitamin D. Vitamin D is the key that unlocks the calcium so your body can use it. Ask your doctor whether you should have a bone density scan to screen for early osteoporosis.

  • 4. Don’t forget key screening tests.

  • Make sure you get regular mammograms starting at age 40, diabetes screening starting at 45, and a colonoscopy at age 50 (earlier if you’re at high risk). Also, because thyroid disease is common in older women, ask your doctor whether you should consider a thyroid screening.
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    HEALTH BENEFITS OF LINA GREEN TEA


  • A cup of green tea is a good way to start your day.

  • “It’s the healthiest thing I can think of to drink,” says Christopher Ochner, PhD. He is a research scientist in nutrition at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. “Green tea is beyond a super food.”

  • In the past 20 years, thousands of studies have shown green tea’s benefits.

  • Healthy cells

  • Why is green tea so good for you? “It’s all about the catechin content,” says Beth Reardon, RD, a Boston nutritionist. Catechins are antioxidants that fight and may even prevent cell damage. Green tea is not processed much before it is poured in your cup, so it is rich in catechins.

  • Healthy heart

  • Green tea has been shown to improve blood flow and lower cholesterol. A 2013 review of many studies found green tea helped prevent a range of heart-related issues, from high blood pressure to congestive heart failure.

  • Brain health

  • What’s good for the heart is usually good for the brain, and your brain needs healthy blood vessels, too. In one Swiss study, MRIs revealed that people who drank green tea had greater activity in the working-memory area of their brains. Green tea has also been shown to help block the formation of plaques that are linked to Alzheimer’s disease.

  • Diabetes

  • Green tea seems to help keep blood sugar stable in people with diabetes. Because catechins lower cholesterol and blood pressure, they can protect against the damage a high-fat diet can cause, Ochner says.

  • Weight loss

  • Green tea can help increase and even change your metabolism, so you burn more calories from fat. Studies show that green tea can also help you keep weight off once you’ve lost it.

  • It’s also a smart swap for sugary drinks. “All things being equal, if you sub 1-2 cups of green tea for one can of soda, over the next year you’d save over 50,000 calories,” says Ochner. That’s more than 15 pounds.

  • Cancer role

  • Studies on green tea’s impact on cancer have been mixed. But green tea is known to aid healthy cells in all stages of growth. There are some indications green tea may help destroy cancer cells.

  • Less stress

  • Sipping tea helps you slow down and relax, Reardon says. An amino acid called theanine found in green tea can provide a calming effect.

  • For a healthy cuppa:

  • Don’t add green tea to boiling water. You’ll kill helpful catechins. Better: 160-170 degree water. Add lemon. Vitamin C makes the healthy compounds in green tea easier to absorb. Dairy, on the other hand, makes it harder to absorb the catechins. Levels of the healthful compounds in green tea can vary. Rule of thumb: Pricier teas usually have more, and canned green-tea drinks have less.
  • Aim for at least four cups a day, two with caffeine and two without. Even more than that seems to have little health downside, other than the possible effects of caffeine, Ochner says. “There could not be a more simple way to improve your health,” he says. Call 0244462689 for yours today Mmbo Adabrejo




    Ten (10) Surprising Facts About Orgasms


    Psst—you over there! Don’t be shy…orgasms are as much a part of women’s health as dental floss—but a lot more fun. For all the things you’ve been dying to find out as well as things you’ve never even thought of, expand your knowledge about the “big O” with this list of enlightening facts.

  • 1. Orgasms can relieve pain.

  • Got a headache? Maybe you should have sex after all. “There is some evidence that orgasms can relieve all kinds of pain—including pain from arthritis, pain after surgery and even pain during childbirth,” notes Lisa Stern, RN, MSN, a nurse practitioner who works with Planned Parenthood in Los Angeles and blogs at Gynfizz.com. “The mechanism is largely due to the body’s release of a chemical called oxytocin during orgasm,” she says. “Oxytocin facilitates bonding, relaxation and other positive emotional states.” While the pain relief from orgasm is short-lived—usually only about eight to 10 minutes—she points to past research indicating that even thinking about sex can help alleviate pain.

  • 2. Condom use doesn’t affect orgasm quality.

  • In case you’re wondering if a condom has anything to do with the quality of your orgasm, don’t. “Women are equally likely to experience orgasm with or without a condom, dispelling myths that condoms don’t make for good sex,” says Debby Herbenick, PhD, a research scientist at Indiana University and author of Because It Feels Good. “In fact, condoms may help a couple spend more time having sex, as a man doesn’t have to ‘pull out’ quickly if he’s worried about ejaculating too soon,” she says. If your guy is resistant to wearing a condom because of lack of sensation, consider manual stimulation first, before intercourse, so he can have an equally enjoyable experience.

  • 3. Thirty percent of women have trouble reaching orgasm.

  • If you’ve ever had trouble climaxing, you’re not alone. According to Planned Parenthood statistics, as many as 1 in 3 women have trouble reaching orgasm when having sex. And as many as 80 percent of women have difficulty with orgasm from vaginal intercourse alone. Clitoral stimulation during intercourse can help, says Stern, but so can medical treatment. “Female sexual dysfunction (FSD), which encompasses the inability to orgasm, is very common—as high as 43 percent, according to some surveys—and has been a topic of much debate and medical investigation lately,” she says. “For some women, topical testosterone therapies or some oral medications can be helpful, but few medical treatments have solid evidence behind them.” Because FSD may be associated with certain medical conditions, be sure to see your doctor to rule out things like thyroid disease, depression or diabetes.

  • 4. Finding your G-spot may improve the likelihood of orgasm.

  • Can you identify your G-spot? The “G” refers to Ernst Gräfenberg, MD, a German gynecologist who is credited with “discovering” it in the 1950s, and sex experts have long touted this area of female genitalia, which is believed to contain a large number of nerve endings, as the key to helping women achieve longer and stronger orgasm. But it’s a controversial topic. Researchers in England refuted its existence recently, even after Italian researchers supposedly found the spot on ultrasound and published their findings in The Journal of Sexual Medicine. Still, sex educators like Los Angeles–based Ava Cadell support the existence of the G-spot, and encourage women to find theirs. While the location may be slightly different in all women, it’s most often found inside the vagina and is characterized by a “rougher” texture.

  • 5. Orgasm gets better with age.

  • Sure, there are plenty of things to gripe about when it comes to age, but your sex life may actually improve—specifically the quality and frequency of orgasm, reports Dr. Herbenick. “Orgasm becomes easier with age,” she says. “As an example, while 61 percent of women ages 18 to 24 experienced orgasm the last time they had sex, 65 percent of women in their 30s did and about 70 percent of women in their 40s and 50s did.” Though the survey didn’t indicate why orgasms come easier with age, we can assume that as women become more sexually experienced, they have more confidence in the bedroom and therefore enjoy themselves more. Additionally, the trust and intimacy that most women experience in long-term relationships can help improve sexual confidence as well.

  • 6. Women who mix things up in the bedroom have more frequent orgasm.

  • If you have trouble reaching orgasm during intercourse, consider switching things up, says Dr. Herbenick. “It is significantly easier for women to experience orgasm when they engage in a variety of sex acts as opposed to just one act,” she says. “For example, vaginal sex plus oral sex would be linked to a higher likelihood of orgasm than either one of them alone. This may be because more sex acts mean that people spend more time having sex.”

  • 7. A woman’s sexual self-esteem can affect the quality of her orgasms.

  • Research shows that how a woman feels about her genitals is linked to the quality of her orgasms. “As a women’s health clinician, I can vouch for the fact that every vagina looks different and there is no ‘perfect’ way for a vagina to look,” says Stern. “As long as your vagina is pain-free and you don’t have any abnormal discharge, sores or other medical problems, you can consider yourself healthy and normal.” Increase your orgasm potential by increasing your confidence, she says. “It’s important to treat yourself the way you would want others to treat you—send yourself healthy, positive messages about yourself and your body.” Another trick: Pull out a hand mirror and take a look! Getting to know yourself down there is the first step in feeling confident about your parts.

  • 8. There is an orgasm “gap.”

  • While it’s true that a small number of men have trouble with orgasm, sex experts report that it’s rare. Instead, a significant percentage of women report not having had an orgasm the last time they had sex, even when their male partner thought they had. “We still have an orgasm gap,” notes Dr. Herbenick. “While 85 percent of men thought their partner had an orgasm during their most recent episode of sex, only 64 percent of women reported having an orgasm.” The cure? It’s complicated, says Dr. Herbenick, but women who are comfortable with and understand their body’s pleasure points can often learn to orgasm regularly.

  • 9. In rare cases, orgasm can happen without genital stimulation.

  • We’ve all heard about women who can orgasm while sitting on a train or while getting a massage, but it’s no urban legend. Experts say it’s a real phenomenon. “I had a friend who had an orgasm every time she used the treadmill,” says Stern. “If that happened to all of us, we’d be a much more physically fit society!” But, humor aside, there’s an explanation for why this occurs. “The reason for spontaneous orgasms during certain activities is twofold—increased blood flow to the genitals and vibration of or contact with the clitoris. The increased blood flow and the general relaxation of a massage can lead to orgasm sometimes, too.”

  • 10. For most women, it takes a while…

  • Many women take longer to climax than their male partners, and that’s perfectly normal, says Stern. In fact, according to statistics, most women require at least 20 minutes of sexual activity to climax. “If you find that your partner often reaches orgasm before you do, there are ways to help him slow down,” she says. “Mental exercises can sometimes work, and so can firm pressure around the base of the penis. If premature ejaculation is a concern, your partner may want to see a primary care doctor or urologist to find some techniques that might help.”

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